100 Days of National Parks: Day 53 – Moonshine Jug, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument

Moonshine Jug

Moonshine Jug

Moonshine Jug
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A lot of times when I wander through the remnants of old homesteads or buildings, like this broken-down barn in John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, I like to come up with stories for the people that used to live and work the land.  I imagine what the buildings looked like before they were abandoned, imagined the lives of the people who built them.  In some cases, I seize on small pieces of left-behind scrap, a book left to rot, a chair that’s been claimed as a nest for squirrels, or a lone green glass jug, glittering in the fading light of the afternoon sun.

Continue reading “100 Days of National Parks: Day 53 – Moonshine Jug, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument”

100 Days of National Parks: Day 39 – Golden Dawn – Crater Lake National Park

Sunrises over Crater Lake are always dramatic, but when the smoke from nearby wildfires obscured the sun during my visit there in September of 2015, I was treated to this remarkable scene across the lake. As damaging and dangerous as wildfires can be, I love the way they impact the light of the rising and setting sun.

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Golden Dawn

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Sunrises over Crater Lake are always dramatic, but when the smoke from nearby wildfires obscured the sun during my visit there in September of 2015, I was treated to this remarkable scene across the lake.  As damaging and dangerous as wildfires can be, I love the way they impact the light of the rising and setting sun.

Continue reading “100 Days of National Parks: Day 39 – Golden Dawn – Crater Lake National Park”

Taking a John-Day in John Day

Sometimes you just need to take a day for yourself, get in the car, and drive until you can’t drive anymore. After a week filled with a lot of emotional and personal frustrations, I headed down to the Portland Saturday Market excited to get out and sell some more photos, only to find all the vendor spots taken and myself left out of the Market for the day. It was a beautiful morning though, the sun casting beautiful morning light along the waterfront in downtown Portland, and I seized the opportunity to head out and look for some areas of Oregon I’d never taken the chance to explore before. I loaded up with all the essentials; half a dozen Blue Star Donuts and enough candy and snack food to last me a week, and set off eastward.

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Sometimes you just need to take a day for yourself, get in the car, and drive until you can’t drive anymore.  After a week filled with a lot of emotional and personal frustrations, I headed down to the Portland Saturday Market excited to get out and sell some more photos, only to find all the vendor spots taken and myself left out of the Market for the day.  It was a beautiful morning though, the sun casting beautiful morning light along the waterfront in downtown Portland, and I seized the opportunity to head out and look for some areas of Oregon I’d never taken the chance to explore before.  I loaded up with all the essentials; half a dozen Blue Star Donuts and enough candy and snack food to last me a week, and set off eastward.

Continue reading “Taking a John-Day in John Day”

100 Days of National Parks: Day 8 – Watchman Overlook, Crater Lake National Park

Watchman Overlook

Crater Lake is Oregon’s only National Park, and stands out as one of the most impressive sights in all of the Pacific Northwest. It’s America’s deepest lake, and it’s pristine blue waters seem unfathomable perched on the rim.

I visited the park for the first time in almost 15 years in September of 2015, driving through what was left of the wildfire scorched northern forest, and sleeping out on the rim, waiting for this amazing sunrise to come up over the eastern horizon. There is something profoundly captivating about this lake and its mysterious depths, the way the water seems eternally still, dark, and full of secrets. It was one of the things I wanted to see the most when I set out on my Pacific Crest Trail hike, and I was glad to have had the opportunity to hike along the rim this past summer, truly a highlight of my year.

Watchman Overlook

Watchman Overlook
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Crater Lake is Oregon’s only National Park, and stands out as one of the most impressive sights in all of the Pacific Northwest.  It’s America’s deepest lake, and it’s pristine blue waters seem unfathomable perched on the rim.

I visited the park for the first time in almost 15 years in September of 2015, driving through what was left of the wildfire scorched northern forest, and sleeping out on the rim, waiting for this amazing sunrise to come up over the eastern horizon.  There is something profoundly captivating about this lake and its mysterious depths, the way the water seems eternally still, dark, and full of secrets.  It was one of the things I wanted to see the most when I set out on my Pacific Crest Trail hike, and I was glad to have had the opportunity to hike along the rim this past summer, truly a highlight of my year.

A Walk in the (Jefferson) Park

Desolation around Jefferson

In September of 2015, I found my days on the Pacific Crest Trail winding to a close. I’d spent the previous two and a half months picking up the pieces of what was supposed to be a continuous 2663 mile hike from Mexico to Canada, but was derailed by a stress fracture after less than a quarter of that. After recovering from my injury, I pushed to return to the trail, at first attempting a southbound hike from the Canadian border, then settling on a more piecemeal approach, targeting specific sections of the Trail that I’d wanted to see, but didn’t get the chance to.

In September of 2015, I found my days on the Pacific Crest Trail winding to a close.  I’d spent the previous two and a half months picking up the pieces of what was supposed to be a continuous 2663 mile hike from Mexico to Canada, but was derailed by a stress fracture after less than a quarter of that.  After recovering from my injury, I pushed to return to the trail, at first attempting a southbound hike from the Canadian border, then settling on a more piecemeal approach, targeting specific sections of the Trail that I’d wanted to see, but didn’t get the chance to.
Continue reading “A Walk in the (Jefferson) Park”